Don of the Jungle

The name orangutan means “man of the forest” in the Malay language. The Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) can weigh up to 200 pounds. Flanged males have prominent cheek pads called flanges and a throat sac used to make loud verbalizations called long calls. They mainly feast on wild fruits like lychees, mangosteens, and figs, and slurp water from holes in trees. The loss of their habitat is a big threat to their existence. They spend nearly their entire lives in trees—swinging in tree tops and building nests for sleep. Rapid deforestation and devastation of their habitat is a major threat to their existence. The Bornean orangutan is listed as Endangered and numbers approximately 41,000.
Borneo is a photographers paradise I really enjoyed shooting them in untouched part of the world. But it was equally challenging as reaching few spots in Borneo as it is a difficult and complicated too.

Unseen Colors

During the rainy season, the beautiful flamingos adorn the Rift Valley with their long-legs, long-neck, black beak, and pink feathery coats. It is indeed feasting to our eyes, we will feel like we are at a beauty pageant of flamingos.
Something different about these birds is their feeding style, they feed with their head upside down. The lower beak is fixed, and the top one is able to move which is the opposite of most birds. The beak also has a filtration system that allows them to strain the food from the sand, under the water.
I was fortunate enough to spend some quality time observing them and clicking as many pictures as I could because to me every frame out there was unique. In this picture, you can see a flock of flamingos flying over a pattern is very similar to the pattern they are flying. Both competing with each other to make it a perfect frame.

The Hippo Strike

The common hippopotamus, or hippo, is a large, mostly herbivorous, semiaquatic mammal native to sub-Saharan Africa, they inhabits rivers, lakes and mangrove swamps. The hippopotamus is among the most dangerous animals in the world as it is highly aggressive and unpredictable. Here also this hippo got angry with the Wildebeest Migration, the amount of sound they were making really made him mad and he came down to shoo them away. Sometimes these hippos get go mad that they end up killing the wildebeest in anger.

The World Is Going Upside Down

After spending few days in Borneo, I got this frame stuck in my mind so firstly, to get this shot, I selected a tree that was in the water so that I can get a good reflection of the sky and its leaves on the tree on water forming a mirror like effect which will make the image look upside down. Then I climbed up on the tree and waited for hours. This is a regular path for the orangutans to cross to the another side small island so I was sure to get this frame if I wait patiently. Hence I waited and waited for long and finally, I got this beautiful frame. This frame will confuse the viewers in one look and that makes it unique. It was indeed a tough task but the end result paid it off in double fold.

Panning Leopard Shot

This image is shot in Keya in my most recent visit. It was my dream to get a Panning Leopard Shot and finally I freezed it in this frame.

Peek A Boo

The Pallas`s cat is also called as Manul. It is a small cat with a dense, plush coat which makes them look bigger and heavier than they actually are; it also helps them to blends with its habitat and conceals it from predators. Unlike other cats, the pupils of Pallas’ cats contract into small circles rather than vertical slits. It is negatively affected by habitat degradation.

It was an extremely cold and windy day and I was at this location to shoot the wild horse that is when I saw 2 eyes sparkling through the snow. At first, I couldn’t make out what it is but later after keenly observing it I got to know that it is actually a Pallas cat. Its fur was so camouflaged to its surrounding that it was nearly impossible to make out that there is a cat sitting right in front of you. I found it very interesting and later I spent hours together observing this cat waiting to see its next move that is when I also got to know that it was actually guarding its meal. It was new learning for me that day about this new species which I haven’t encountered before.

Emperor Penguin Parenting

The emperor penguin is the tallest and heaviest of all living penguin species and is endemic to Antarctica. The male and female are similar in plumage and size. These flightless birds breed in the winter. After a courtship of several weeks, a female emperor penguin lays one single egg then leaves! Each penguin egg’s father balances it on his feet and covers it with his brood pouch, a very warm layer of feathered skin designed to keep the egg cozy. There the males stand, for about 65 days, through icy temperatures, cruel winds, and blinding storms. Finally, after about two months, the females return from the sea, bringing food they regurgitate, or bring up, to feed the now hatched chicks. The males eagerly leave for their own fishing session at sea, and the mothers take over care of the chicks for a while. As the young penguins grow, adults leave them in groups of chicks called crèches while they leave to fish. Five years later, if they survive in their ocean, the young penguins will return to become parents themselves. There is a reason for the timing of emperor penguins’ hatching. By December, when the Antarctic weather has warmed somewhat, the ice the penguins occupy begins to break up, bringing open waters closer to the nesting sites.
I was literally lying flat on the floor while I was shooting this image. Why I did this is because when we go lower than their height they feel less scared of being around us. Hence they opted to spend a good amount of time beside me and I was lucky enough to capture some beautiful shots. On this particular trip, I had walked an average of 8 hours per day in search of a perfect frame.

Mandarin Duck 05

The Mandarin duck is a beautifully colored bird with a greenish-black forehead and a purple crest near the back of the head. The sides of the head are creamy white with a chestnut patch below the eyes. The sides of the neck and the cheeks have longer brown feathers.

An Emperor Penguin with kids

The emperor penguin is the tallest and heaviest of all living penguin species and is endemic to Antarctica. The male and female are similar in plumage and size. These flightless birds breed in the winter. After a courtship of several weeks, a female emperor penguin lays one single egg then leaves! Each penguin egg’s father balances it on his feet and covers it with his brood pouch, a very warm layer of feathered skin designed to keep the egg cozy. There the males stand, for about 65 days, through icy temperatures, cruel winds, and blinding storms. Finally, after about two months, the females return from the sea, bringing food they regurgitate, or bring up, to feed the now hatched chicks. The males eagerly leave for their own fishing session at sea, and the mothers take over care of the chicks for a while. As the young penguins grow, adults leave them in groups of chicks called crèches while they leave to fish. Five years later, if they survive in their ocean, the young penguins will return to become parents themselves. There is a reason for the timing of emperor penguins’ hatching. By December, when the Antarctic weather has warmed somewhat, the ice the penguins occupy begins to break up, bringing open waters closer to the nesting sites.
I was literally lying flat on the floor while I was shooting this image. Why I did this is because when we go lower than their height they feel less scared of being around us. Hence they opted to spend a good amount of time beside me and I was lucky enough to capture some beautiful shots. On this particular trip, I had walked an average of 8 hours per day in search of a perfect frame.

Etosha Pan

Etosha, meaning ‘Great White Place’ is made of a large mineral pan. The pan is believed to have developed through tectonic plate activity over about ten million years and around 16,000 years ago, when ice sheets were melting across the landmasses of the Northern Hemisphere, a wet climate phase in southern Africa filled Etosha Lake. Today however the Etosha Pan is mostly dry clay mud split into hexagonal shapes, but still, we can see a thin sheet of water is covering it. In this image, you can see the reflection of Giraffe`s standing on the opposite side of this water collection and in this frame, you can also witness the beautiful magical evening light that added additional scenic beauty.